algebra

Increase Views per Visit by Linking Within your Blog

One of the most basic and useful performance indicator for blogs is the average number of views per visit. If it is high, that means visitors stick around to explore the blog after reading a post. They value the blog for being well-written and informative. But in the fast paced, content saturated online world, achieving a lot of views per visit is not easy.

You can help out a little by making exploring your blog easier for readers. A good way to do this is to link within your blog, that is, to provide internal links. Keep in mind though that random links won’t help much. If you link one of your blog post to another, they should be connected in a meaningful way, for example by covering the same topic or giving relevant additional information to what a visitor just read.

Being mathematically curious, I wanted to find a way to judge what impact such internal links have on the overall views per visit. Assume you start with no internal links and observe a current number views per visitor of x. Now you add n internal links in your blog, which has in total a number of m entries. Given that the probability for a visitor to make use of an internal link is p, what will the overall number of views per visit change to? Yesterday night I derived a formula for that:

x’ = x + (n / m) · (1 / (1-p) – 1)

For example, my blog (which has as of now very few internal links) has an average of x = 2.3 views per visit and m = 42 entries. If I were to add n = 30 internal links and assuming a reader makes use of an internal link with the probability p = 20 % = 0.2, this should theoretically change into:

x’ = 2.3 + (30 / 42) · (1 / 0.8 – 1) = 2.5 views per visit

A solid 9 % increase in views per visit and this just by providing visitors a simple way to explore. So make sure to go over your blog and connect articles that are relevant to each other. The higher the relevancy of the links, the higher the probability that readers will end up using them. For example, if I only added n = 10 internal links instead of thirty, but had them at such a level of relevancy that the probability of them being used increases to p = 40 % = 0.4, I would end up with the same overall views per visit:

x’ = 2.3 + (10 / 42) · (1 / 0.6 – 1) = 2.5 views per visit

So it’s about relevancy as much as it is about amount. And in the spirit of not spamming, I’d prefer adding a few high-relevancy internal links that a lot low-relevancy ones.

If you’d like to know more on how to optimize your blog, check out: Setting the Order for your WordPress Blog Posts and Keywords: How To Use Them Properly On a Website or Blog.

Physics (And The Formula That Got Me Hooked)

A long time ago, in my teen years, this was the formula that got me hooked on physics. Why? I can’t say for sure. I guess I was very surprised that you could calculate something like this so easily. So with some nostalgia, I present another great formula from the field of physics. It will be a continuation of and a last section on energy.

To heat something, you need a certain amount of energy E (in J). How much exactly? To compute this we require three inputs: the mass m (in kg) of the object we want to heat, the temperature difference T (in °C) between initial and final state and the so called specific heat c (in J per kg °C) of the material that is heated. The relationship is quite simple:

E = c · m · T

If you double any of the input quantities, the energy required for heating will double as well. A very helpful addition to problems involving heating is this formula:

E = P · t

with P (in watt = W = J/s) being the power of the device that delivers heat and t (in s) the duration of the heat delivery.

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The specific heat of water is c = 4200 J per kg °C. How much energy do you need to heat m = 1 kg of water from room temperature (20 °C) to its boiling point (100 °C)? Note that the temperature difference between initial and final state is T = 80 °C. So we have all the quantities we need.

E = 4200 · 1 · 80 = 336,000 J

Additional question: How long will it take a water heater with an output of 2000 W to accomplish this? Let’s set up an equation for this using the second formula:

336,000 = 2000 · t

t ≈ 168 s ≈ 3 minutes

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We put m = 1 kg of water (c = 4200 J per kg °C) in one container and m = 1 kg of sand (c = 290 J per kg °C) in another next to it. This will serve as an artificial beach. Using a heater we add 10,000 J of heat to each container. By what temperature will the water and the sand be raised?

Let’s turn to the water. From the given data and the great formula we can set up this equation:

10,000 = 4200 · 1 · T

T ≈ 2.4 °C

So the water temperature will be raised by 2.4 °C. What about the sand? It also receives 10,000 J.

10,000 = 290 · 1 · T

T ≈ 34.5 °C

So sand (or any ground in general) will heat up much stronger than water. In other words: the temperature of ground reacts quite strongly to changes in energy input while water is rather sluggish. This explains why the climate near oceans is milder than inland, that is, why the summers are less hot and the winters less cold. The water efficiently dampens the changes in temperature.

It also explains the land-sea-breeze phenomenon (seen in the image below). During the day, the sun’s energy will cause the ground to be hotter than the water. The air above the ground rises, leading to cooler air flowing from the ocean to the land. At night, due to the lack of the sun’s power, the situation reverses. The ground cools off quickly and now it’s the air above the water that rises.

Image
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I hope this formula got you hooked as well. It’s simple, useful and can explain quite a lot of physics at the same time. It doesn’t get any better than this. Now it’s time to leave the concept of energy and turn to other topics.

This was an excerpt from my Kindle ebook: Great Formulas Explained – Physics, Mathematics, Economics. For another interesting physics quicky, check out: Intensity (or: How Much Power Will Burst Your Eardrums?).