Area

New Release for Kindle: Math Shorts – Integrals

Yesterday I released the second part of my “Math Shorts” series. This time it’s all about integrals. Integrals are among the most useful and fascinating mathematical concepts ever conceived. The ebook is a practical introduction for all those who don’t want to miss out. In it you’ll find down-to-earth explanations, detailed examples and interesting applications. Check out the sample (see link to product page) a taste of the action.

Important note: to enjoy the book, you need solid prior knowledge in algebra and calculus. This means in particular being able to solve all kinds of equations, finding and interpreting derivatives as well as understanding the notation associated with these topics.

Click the cover to open the product page:

cover

Here’s the TOC:

Section 1: The Big Picture
-Anti-Derivatives
-Integrals
-Applications

Section 2: Basic Anti-Derivatives and Integrals
-Power Functions
-Sums of Functions
-Examples of Definite Integrals
-Exponential Functions
-Trigonometric Functions
-Putting it all Together

Section 3: Applications
-Area – Basics
-Area – Numerical Example
-Area – Parabolic Gate
-Area – To Infinity and Beyond
-Volume – Basics
-Volume – Numerical Example
-Volume – Gabriel’s Horn
-Average Value
-Kinematics

Section 4: Advanced Integration Techniques
-Substitution – Basics
-Substitution – Indefinite Integrals
-Substitution – Definite Integrals
-Integration by Parts – Basics
-Integration by Parts – Indefinite Integrals
-Integration by Parts – Definite Integrals

Section 5: Appendix
-Formulas To Know By Heart
-Greek Alphabet
-Copyright and Disclaimer
-Request to the Reader

Enjoy!

Computing the Surface Area of a Person – Mosteller Formula

While doing research for my new book “More Great Formulas Explained”, I came across a neat formula that can be used to calculate the surface area of a person. It goes by the name Mosteller formula and requires two inputs: the mass m (in kg) and the height h (in cm). The surface area S (in m²) is proportional to the square root of m times h:

S = sqrt (m * h / 3600)

For example, a person with the weight m = 75 kg and height h = 175 cm can be expected to have the body surface area S = 1.91 m². A note for American readers: you can use this table to easily convert the height in feet / inches to centimeters.

What’s the use of this? In my book I needed to know this quantity to compute heat loss. According to Newton’s law of cooling, the heat loss rate P (in Watt = Joules per second) is proportional to the surface area S and the temperature difference ΔT (in °C or K):

P = a * S *ΔT

with a being the so called heat transfer coefficient. For calm air it has the value a = 10 W/(m² * K). A person’s body temperature is around 37 °C. So the m = 75 kg and h = 175 cm person from above would lose this amount of heat every second at an air temperature of 20 °C:

P = 10 W/(m² * K) * 1.91 m² * 17 °C = 325 Watt

That is of course assuming the person is naked, clothing will reduce this value significantly. So the surface area formula indeed is useful.

How much habitable land is there on earth per person?

What is the total area of habitable land on Earth? And how much habitable land does that leave one person? We’ll use the value r = 6400 km as the radius of Earth. According to the corresponding formula for spheres, the surface area of Earth is:

S = 4 * π * (6400 km)^2 ≈ 515 million square km

Since about 30 % of Earth’s surface is land, this means that the total area of land is 0.3 * 515 ≈ 155 million square km, about half of which is habitable for humans. With roughly 7 billion people alive today, we can conclude that there is 0.011 square km habitable land available per person. This corresponds to a square with 100 m ≈ 330 ft length and width.