experiment

Another Home Experiment – Wind Speed and Sound Level

Recently I told you about my home experiment regarding impact speed and sound level. I did another experiment with my sound level meter, this time I was interested in finding out how the sound level varies with the wind speed. So I took my anemometer (yep, that’s a thing) to measure the wind speed and at the same time noted the sound level. I collected some data points and plotted them. Here’s the result:

homeexperiment

As you can see the fit is not that bad (the adjusted r-square is 0.91).

So the sound level grows with the wind velocity to the power of 0.22, meaning that if the wind speed increases by a factor of twenty-five, the sound level doubles. According to the empirical formula, the noise from the wind inside a category 1 and 2 hurricane is comparable to the sound level at a rock concert. This is of course assuming that the formula holds true past the 12 m/s range over which it was determined (which is not necessarily the case, but for now the best guess).

Home Experiment – Impact Speed and Sound Level

A while ago I got my hands on a sound level meter and pondered what to do with it. Sound level versus distance from source? Too boring, there’s already a formula for that (see here: Intensity: How Much Power Will Burst Your Eardrums?). What I noticed though is that I’ve never seen a formula relating impact height or speed to sound level, that seemed interesting. So I bought a small wooden sphere at a local store and dropped it from various heights, at each impact recording the maximum sound level. I dropped the sphere from 8 different heights and to reduce the effect of random fluctuations 20 times from each height. So in total I collected 160 data points. I’m not so sure if my neighbors were happy about that.

I calculated the impact speed v from the drop height h using the common v = sqrt (2 * g * h). As you might know, this formula neglects air resistance. However, I’m not concerned about that. The wooden sphere was small and massive and only dropped from heights below about 1 ft. The computed impact speed shouldn’t be off by more than a few percent.

Here’s the resulting plot of impact speed versus sound level (in decibels):

Impact Speed Sound Level Decibel

The fit turned out to be fantastic and implies that if you increase the impact speed by a factor of five, the sound level doubles. What’s the point of this? I don’t know, but it’s a neat graph and that’s good enough for me.