marketing

Increase Views per Visit by Linking Within your Blog

One of the most basic and useful performance indicator for blogs is the average number of views per visit. If it is high, that means visitors stick around to explore the blog after reading a post. They value the blog for being well-written and informative. But in the fast paced, content saturated online world, achieving a lot of views per visit is not easy.

You can help out a little by making exploring your blog easier for readers. A good way to do this is to link within your blog, that is, to provide internal links. Keep in mind though that random links won’t help much. If you link one of your blog post to another, they should be connected in a meaningful way, for example by covering the same topic or giving relevant additional information to what a visitor just read.

Being mathematically curious, I wanted to find a way to judge what impact such internal links have on the overall views per visit. Assume you start with no internal links and observe a current number views per visitor of x. Now you add n internal links in your blog, which has in total a number of m entries. Given that the probability for a visitor to make use of an internal link is p, what will the overall number of views per visit change to? Yesterday night I derived a formula for that:

x’ = x + (n / m) · (1 / (1-p) – 1)

For example, my blog (which has as of now very few internal links) has an average of x = 2.3 views per visit and m = 42 entries. If I were to add n = 30 internal links and assuming a reader makes use of an internal link with the probability p = 20 % = 0.2, this should theoretically change into:

x’ = 2.3 + (30 / 42) · (1 / 0.8 – 1) = 2.5 views per visit

A solid 9 % increase in views per visit and this just by providing visitors a simple way to explore. So make sure to go over your blog and connect articles that are relevant to each other. The higher the relevancy of the links, the higher the probability that readers will end up using them. For example, if I only added n = 10 internal links instead of thirty, but had them at such a level of relevancy that the probability of them being used increases to p = 40 % = 0.4, I would end up with the same overall views per visit:

x’ = 2.3 + (10 / 42) · (1 / 0.6 – 1) = 2.5 views per visit

So it’s about relevancy as much as it is about amount. And in the spirit of not spamming, I’d prefer adding a few high-relevancy internal links that a lot low-relevancy ones.

If you’d like to know more on how to optimize your blog, check out: Setting the Order for your WordPress Blog Posts and Keywords: How To Use Them Properly On a Website or Blog.

Article Marketing Myths And Facts

By now everyone has heard of article marketing and so many people out define it in so many different ways there that it has become hard for people new to article marketing to understand.

In general, article marketing is where you write an article on a topic that is related to your website topic. Not a promotional article for your website, but an article about something that is informative to the reader. In the article you use keywords and phrases that relate to your topic as well, much like you would optimize a webpage. Your article when reprinted will be the text of a webpage or webpages.

In the author bio section at the bottom is some info about you and links to your website. It is suggested that you put in one link to your main page and one to an interior page that fits the article you are writing.

If your article is submitted to websites that take article submissions and offers free content to webmasters, then webmasters choose to repost your article on their websites, the links in the author bio section become links from their websites to your website.

Now lets go on to the myths and facts about article marketing.

MYTH: Article marketing doesn’t really help you all that much.

FACT: Article Marketing can help you increase your link popularity and be a source of some of the most targeted traffic you can get.

MYTH: Reprinted Articles only get indexed as supplemental pages, therefore it doesn’t help enough to make it worthwhile.

FACT: Depending on where the article gets submitted to, the article itself can get a top 10 listing in major search engines and not as a supplemental page.

MYTH: Submitting your article everywhere creates duplicate content and the search engines will punish or discount those pages as a result.

FACT: If search engines punished duplicate content in the way that myth suggests then all rss feeds that cause a post in a blog to be reproduced to be discounted or published and they are not. The New York Times articles and CNN stuff is blasted all over the web and are not punished or discounted.

Duplicate content is two webpages that are around 70% similar, not two webpages that have similar text on them.

MYTH: The only way article marketing works is you write an article then submit it to thousands of article submission websites.

FACT: There is more than one way to make article marketing work for you. The way mentioned above works okay if you are looking to get a lot of links back to your website whether they are related or not and can be effective if you currently have very little or no link popularity at all.

Another way is to hand submit your article to article submission websites that only accept articles related to your topic. This is more difficult but the links help you more just through the submissions and it’s more likely that the websites that pick up and repost your article will be also related to your topic which can help you with better links and targeted traffic.

Yet another way is to write a very high quality article that you really take your time on and research. You then choose a very high traffic website related to your topic. One that has great PR and a lot of visitors.

Email them your article and offer them an exclusive if they will print your article with your links included in the bio. If your article is of good quality and they get an exclusive you have a good chance they will post your article there.

This one posting of your article can be more powerful than the mass submitted article method if you choose the website you submit it to carefully.

Last but not least, posting your article exclusively on your own website is a great way to add fresh content and if the article is good, people will link directly to the article increasing both traffic and PR for your webpage where you posted the article. But for this to work you need to already have some traffic to work with.

MYTH: You should always post your article in your website first, then wait to get crawled by the search engines before submitting the article elsewhere.

FACT: Adding articles to your own website is called adding content. Submitting those articles to other websites is called article marketing. With article marketing you don’t want the article indexed on your website first.

Yes you read that right. You do not want the article indexed on your website first. You are or should already be doing SEO on your website and adding fresh content to your website for the search engines to get traffic from them.

Submitting articles to other websites and having the search engines find it there first gives another gateway that people can find your website through.

If the websites that you submitted your articles to get crawled often, then having your article appear there with the links intact will get your website crawled as well.

If the websites you submitted your article to are getting indexed well by the search engines, then your article being found on their website first might get it in the top 10 results.

Placing it into your own website with no or low PR might not have gotten the article indexed at all.

I hope this article will clear up some of the myths about article marketing and that it has helped you understand how and why it works.