mercedes

How To Calculate Maximum Car Speed + Examples (Mercedes C-180, Bugatti Veyron)

How do you determine the maximum possible speed your car can go? Well, one rather straight-forward option is to just get into your car, go on the Autobahn and push down the pedal until the needle stops moving. The problem with this option is that there’s not always an Autobahn nearby. So we need to find another way.

Luckily, physics can help us out here. You probably know that whenever a body is moving at constant speed, there must be a balance of forces in play. The force that is aiming to accelerate the object is exactly balanced by the force that wants to decelerate it. Our first job is to find out what forces we are dealing with.

Obvious candidates for the retarding forces are ground friction and air resistance. However, in our case looking at the latter is sufficient since at high speeds, air resistance becomes the dominating factor. This makes things considerably easier for us. So how can we calculate air resistance?

To compute air resistance we need to know several inputs. One of these is the air density D (in kg/m³), which at sea level has the value D = 1.25 kg/m³. We also need to know the projected area A (in m²) of the car, which is just the product of width times height. Of course there’s also the dependence on the velocity v (in m/s) relative to the air. The formula for the drag force is:

F = 0.5 · c · D · A · v²

with c (dimensionless) being the drag coefficient. This is the one quantity in this formula that is tough to determine. You probably don’t know this value for your car and there’s a good chance you will never find it out even if you try. In general, you want to have this value as low as possible.

On ecomodder.com you can find a table of drag coefficients for many common modern car models. Excluding prototype models, the drag coefficient in this list ranges between c = 0.25 for the Honda Insight to c = 0.58 for the Jeep Wrangler TJ Soft Top. The average value is c = 0.33. In first approximation you can estimate your car’s drag coefficient by placing it in this range depending on how streamlined it looks compared to the average car.

With the equation: power equals force times speed, we can use the above formula to find out how much power (in W) we need to provide to counter the air resistance at a certain speed:

P = F · v = 0.5 · c · D · A · v³

Of course we can also reverse this equation. Given that our car is able to provide a certain amount of power P, this is the maximum speed v we can achieve:

v = ( 2 · P / (c · D · A) )1/3

From the formula we can see that the top speed grows with the third root of the car’s power, meaning that when we increase the power eightfold, the maximum speed doubles. So even a slight increase in top speed has to be bought with a significant increase in energy output.

Note the we have to input the power in the standard physical unit watt rather than the often used unit horsepower. Luckily the conversion is very easy, just multiply horsepower with 746 to get to watt.

Let’s put the formula to the test.

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I drive a ten year old Mercedes C180 Compressor. According the Mercedes-Benz homepage, its drag coefficient is c = 0.29 and its power P = 143 HP ≈ 106,680 W. Its width and height is w = 1.77 m and h = 1.45 m respectively. What is the maximum possible speed?

First we need the projected area of the car:

A = 1.77 m · 1.45 m ≈ 2.57 m²

Now we can use the formula:

v = ( 2 · 106,680 / (0.29 · 1.25 · 2.57) )1/3

v ≈ 61.2 m/s ≈ 220.3 km/h ≈ 136.6 mph

From my experience on the Autobahn, this seems to be very realistic. You can reach 200 Km/h quite well, but the acceleration is already noticeably lower at this point.

If you ever get the chance to visit Germany, make sure to rent a ridiculously fast sports car (you can rent a Porsche 911 Carrera for as little as 200 $ per day) and find a nice section on the Autobahn with unlimited speed. But remember: unless you’re overtaking, always use the right lane. The left lanes are reserved for overtaking. Never overtake on the right side, nobody will expect you there. And make sure to check the rear-view mirror often. You might think you’re going fast, but there’s always someone going even faster. Let them pass. Last but not least, stay focused and keep your eyes on the road. Traffic jams can appear out of nowhere and you don’t want to end up in the back of a truck at these speeds.

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The fastest production car at the present time is the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport. Is has a drag coefficient of c = 0.35, width w = 2 m, height h = 1.19 m and power P = 1200 HP = 895,200 W. Let’s calculate its maximum possible speed:

v = ( 2 · 895,200 / (0.35 · 1.25 · 2 · 1.19) )1/3

v ≈ 119.8 m/s ≈ 431.3 km/h ≈ 267.4 mph

Does this seem unreasonably high? It does. But the car has actually been recorded going 431 Km/h, so we are right on target. If you’d like to purchase this car, make sure you have 4,000,000 $ in your bank account.

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This was an excerpt from the ebook More Great Formulas Explained.

Check out my BEST OF for more interesting physics articles.

Sources:

http://ecomodder.com/wiki/index.php/Vehicle_Coefficient_of_Drag_List

http://www.mercedes-benz.de/content/germany/mpc/mpc_germany_website/de/home_mpc/passengercars/home/_used_cars/technical_data.0006.html

http://www.carfolio.com/specifications/models/car/?car=218999

Acceleration – A Short and Simple Explanation

The three basic quantities used in kinematics are distance, velocity and acceleration. Let’s first look at velocity before moving on to the main topic. The velocity is simply the rate of change in distance. If we cover the distance d in a time span t, than the average velocity during this interval is:

v = d / t

So if we drive d = 800 meters in t = 40 seconds, the average speed is v = 800 meters / 40 seconds = 20 m/s. No surprise here. Note that there are many different units commonly used for velocity: kilometers per hour, feet per second, miles per hour, etc … The SI unit is m/s, so unless otherwise stated, you have to input the velocity in m/s into a formula to get a correct result.

Acceleration is also defined as the rate of change, but this time with respect to velocity. If the velocity changes by the amount v in a time span t, the average acceleration is:

a = v / t

For example, my beloved Mercedes C-180 Compressor can go from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour (or 27.8 meters per second) in about 9 seconds. So the average acceleration during this time is:

a = 27.8 meters per second / 9 seconds = 3.1 m/s²

Is that a lot? Obviously we should know some reference values to be able to judge acceleration.

The one value you should know is: g = 9.81 m/s². This is the acceleration experienced in free fall. And you can take the word “experienced” literally because unlike velocity, we really do feel acceleration. Our inner ear system contains structures that enable us to perceive it. Often times acceleration is compared to this value because it provides a meaningful and easily relatable reference value.

So the acceleration in the Mercedes C-180 Compressor is not quite as thrilling as free fall, it only accelerates with about 3.1 / 9.81 = 0.32 g. How much higher can it go for production cars? Well, meet the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport. It goes from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour (or 27.8 meters per second) in 2.2 seconds. This translates into an acceleration of:

a = 27.8 meters per second / 2.2 seconds = 12.6 m/s²

This is more than the free fall acceleration! To be more specific, it’s 12.6 / 9.81 = 1.28 g. If you got $ 4,000,000 to spare, how about getting one of these? But even this is nothing compared to what astronauts have to endure during launch. Here you can see a typical acceleration profile of a Space Shuttle launch:

(Taken from http://www.russellwestbrook.com)

Right before the main engine shutoff the acceleration peaks at close to 30 m/s² or 3 g. That’s certainly not for everyone. How much can a person endure by the way? According to “Aerospace Medicine” accelerations of around 5 g and higher can result in death if sustained for more than a few seconds. Very short acceleration bursts can be survivable up to about 50 g, which is a value that can be reached and exceeded in a car crash.

One more thing to keep in mind about acceleration: it is always a result of a force. If a force F (measured in Newtons = N) acts on a body, it responds by accelerating. The stronger the force is, the higher the resulting acceleration. This is just Newton’s Second Law:

a = F / m

So a force of F = 210 N on a body of m = 70 kg leads to an acceleration of a = 210 N / 70 kg = 3 m/s². The same force however on a m = 140 kg mass only leads to the acceleration a = 210 N / 140 kg = 1.5 m/s². Hence, mass provides resistance to acceleration. You need more force to accelerate a massive body at the same rate as a light body.

For more interesting physics articles, check out my BEST OF.