Newton

The Difference Between Mass and Weight

In general, it is acceptable to use weight as a synonym for mass. However, in a very strict physical sense this is incorrect. Weight is the gravitational force experienced by an object and accordingly measured in Newtons and not kilograms. An object of mass m has the weight F:

F = m · g

with the gravitational acceleration g. On Earth the value of the gravitational acceleration at the surface is g = 9.81 m/s². So a typical adult with a mass of m = 75 kg has a weight of:

F = 75 kg · 9.81 m/s² = 735.75 N

On the moon (or any other point of the universe), the mass would remain at m = 75 kg. But since the gravitational acceleration on the moon is much lower (g = 1.62 m/s²), the weight changes to:

F = 75 kg · 1.62 m/s² = 121.5 N

Keep this distinction in mind. Mass is a fundamental property of an object that does not depend on the conditions outside the object, while weight is a variable that changes with the strength of surrounding gravitational field.

(This was an excerpt from Physics! In Quantities and Examples)

What is Mass? A Short and Simple Explanation

Mass is such a fundamental property of matter that it is hard to define without drifting into philosophical realms. Newton’s Second Law provides a great way to understand mass from a physical point of view. The law states that force F (in N) is the product of mass m (in kg) and acceleration a (in m/s²):

F = m · a

So according to this, mass is a measure of an object’s resistance to a change in speed. If the mass is small, a small force is sufficient to produce a noticeable acceleration. However, much more force is necessary to produce the same acceleration for a massive object.

Another way of looking at mass is provided by Newton’s Law of Gravitation. Newton found that the attracting gravitational force between two objects is proportional to the product of their masses m and M:

F ~ m · M

So additionally to creating resistance to changes in state of motion, mass is also the source of gravitational attraction. It seems obvious that in both cases we are talking about the same quantity. But is this actually the case? Is the inertial mass, the mass responsible for opposing changes in velocity, really the same as the gravitational mass, that gives rise to gravity?

This question has led to heated debates among physicist for centuries. All experiments conducted so far, with ever increasing accuracy, have shown that indeed the inertial mass is identical to the gravitational mass. Today, almost all physicists have accepted this equivalence as reality.

The SI unit of mass is kilograms. Ever since 1889, one kilogram has been defined as the mass of the international prototype kilogram (IPK) that is stored in the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Paris. However, during the 24th General Conference on Weights and Measures that took place in 2011, physicists have agreed to redefine this unit by connecting it to the Planck constant.

Other units that are commonly used for mass are grams (1/1000 of a kilogram), the pound (equal to about 0.45 kilograms) and the tonne (equal to 1000 kilograms). For atoms and molecules scientists use the atomic mass unit u. One u is equivalent to 1.66 · 10-27 kg, which is roughly the mass of a neutron or proton.

(This was an excerpt from Physics! In Quantities and Examples)

Computing the Surface Area of a Person – Mosteller Formula

While doing research for my new book “More Great Formulas Explained”, I came across a neat formula that can be used to calculate the surface area of a person. It goes by the name Mosteller formula and requires two inputs: the mass m (in kg) and the height h (in cm). The surface area S (in m²) is proportional to the square root of m times h:

S = sqrt (m * h / 3600)

For example, a person with the weight m = 75 kg and height h = 175 cm can be expected to have the body surface area S = 1.91 m². A note for American readers: you can use this table to easily convert the height in feet / inches to centimeters.

What’s the use of this? In my book I needed to know this quantity to compute heat loss. According to Newton’s law of cooling, the heat loss rate P (in Watt = Joules per second) is proportional to the surface area S and the temperature difference ΔT (in °C or K):

P = a * S *ΔT

with a being the so called heat transfer coefficient. For calm air it has the value a = 10 W/(m² * K). A person’s body temperature is around 37 °C. So the m = 75 kg and h = 175 cm person from above would lose this amount of heat every second at an air temperature of 20 °C:

P = 10 W/(m² * K) * 1.91 m² * 17 °C = 325 Watt

That is of course assuming the person is naked, clothing will reduce this value significantly. So the surface area formula indeed is useful.

Acceleration – A Short and Simple Explanation

The three basic quantities used in kinematics are distance, velocity and acceleration. Let’s first look at velocity before moving on to the main topic. The velocity is simply the rate of change in distance. If we cover the distance d in a time span t, than the average velocity during this interval is:

v = d / t

So if we drive d = 800 meters in t = 40 seconds, the average speed is v = 800 meters / 40 seconds = 20 m/s. No surprise here. Note that there are many different units commonly used for velocity: kilometers per hour, feet per second, miles per hour, etc … The SI unit is m/s, so unless otherwise stated, you have to input the velocity in m/s into a formula to get a correct result.

Acceleration is also defined as the rate of change, but this time with respect to velocity. If the velocity changes by the amount v in a time span t, the average acceleration is:

a = v / t

For example, my beloved Mercedes C-180 Compressor can go from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour (or 27.8 meters per second) in about 9 seconds. So the average acceleration during this time is:

a = 27.8 meters per second / 9 seconds = 3.1 m/s²

Is that a lot? Obviously we should know some reference values to be able to judge acceleration.

The one value you should know is: g = 9.81 m/s². This is the acceleration experienced in free fall. And you can take the word “experienced” literally because unlike velocity, we really do feel acceleration. Our inner ear system contains structures that enable us to perceive it. Often times acceleration is compared to this value because it provides a meaningful and easily relatable reference value.

So the acceleration in the Mercedes C-180 Compressor is not quite as thrilling as free fall, it only accelerates with about 3.1 / 9.81 = 0.32 g. How much higher can it go for production cars? Well, meet the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport. It goes from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour (or 27.8 meters per second) in 2.2 seconds. This translates into an acceleration of:

a = 27.8 meters per second / 2.2 seconds = 12.6 m/s²

This is more than the free fall acceleration! To be more specific, it’s 12.6 / 9.81 = 1.28 g. If you got $ 4,000,000 to spare, how about getting one of these? But even this is nothing compared to what astronauts have to endure during launch. Here you can see a typical acceleration profile of a Space Shuttle launch:

(Taken from http://www.russellwestbrook.com)

Right before the main engine shutoff the acceleration peaks at close to 30 m/s² or 3 g. That’s certainly not for everyone. How much can a person endure by the way? According to “Aerospace Medicine” accelerations of around 5 g and higher can result in death if sustained for more than a few seconds. Very short acceleration bursts can be survivable up to about 50 g, which is a value that can be reached and exceeded in a car crash.

One more thing to keep in mind about acceleration: it is always a result of a force. If a force F (measured in Newtons = N) acts on a body, it responds by accelerating. The stronger the force is, the higher the resulting acceleration. This is just Newton’s Second Law:

a = F / m

So a force of F = 210 N on a body of m = 70 kg leads to an acceleration of a = 210 N / 70 kg = 3 m/s². The same force however on a m = 140 kg mass only leads to the acceleration a = 210 N / 140 kg = 1.5 m/s². Hence, mass provides resistance to acceleration. You need more force to accelerate a massive body at the same rate as a light body.

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